Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    



Vanderbilt Takes Investigational New Drug From Bench To Bedside


 
P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD

Patients with serious brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia could benefit from an investigational new drug (IND) that has received notification from the FDA that testing in humans may proceed after more than 10 years of research by scientists at Vanderbilt University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

"This is the first instance I am aware of where an academic drug discovery group moved a molecule for treatment of chronic brain disorders all the way from early discovery to human trials without there being, at some point along the way, a pharmaceutical partner," said P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD, director, Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). "And that really is crossing what people refer to all of the time as the 'Valley of Death,' where good research discoveries have a hard time moving into the real testing phase."

For Alzheimer's disease, the IND targets major pathologies of the disease and offers highly selective activation of a key receptor unlike the current standard of care, cholinesterase inhibitors. Vanderbilt researchers said the molecule might be broadly effective across a number of cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. In schizophrenia, current treatments address the positive symptoms of the disease, including hallucinations and delusions, but not the negative symptoms and cognitive disturbances of schizophrenia. "People who treat schizophrenia patients commonly agree that the negative symptoms and cognitive disturbances are the major factors that decrease the ability for these patients to integrate in society," Conn said. "And we have no treatments for those so our hope is that this molecule will be effective."

VCNDD Co-Director Craig W. Lindsley, PhD, director of Medicinal Chemistry and the William K. Warren, Jr. Chair in Medicine, said phase I testing will assess drug safety and tolerability in young healthy volunteers, a process that could take a year. If successful, the phase II and III studies would include patients with either Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia and could take three-five years to complete.

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Actuaries Examine How Changes to ACA Market Rules Would Affect Risk Adjustment

Proposals to alter the market rules applying to the individual and small group health insurance markets would likely require changing the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) risk adjustment program, the American Academy of Actuaries said in an issue brief published today.

Read More

Women to Watch Class of 2017

The women selected for the Class of 2017 are dedicated, talented, passionate, smart, collaborative innovators. In short, they are people we want to watch as leaders in their respective fields modeling ways to create a more efficient, effective healthcare system.

Read More

Fighting Breast Cancer with New Research, New Tools

New research, new tools bring new hope when it comes to preventing and treating breast cancer.

Read More

SMILE: New 3D Minimally Invasive Surgery for Myopia Makes Statewide Debut

A new minimally invasive procedure to treat myopia is something to SMILE about.

Read More

ONcology Rounds

News of note impacting cancer care.

Read More

New Take on an Old Disease

A multidisciplinary effort at The Saint Thomas Lung Cancer and Thoracic Center means more treatment choices for patients.

Read More

Prevent, Detect & Treat

Prevention of lung cancer and the science behind it are driving researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Read More

The Science of Mental Health

Richard Shelton, MD, is on a mission to bring the latest medical breakthroughs to mental health patients faster than ever.

Read More

Study Highlights Higher Death Rate for Young People Experiencing an Incident Episode of Psychosis

A new study of all cause death in the 12 months following the first incidence of psychosis found a much higher than anticipated death rate in those ages 16-30.

Read More

Personalized Medicine & Lung Cancer

Genetics playing a significant role in the future of lung cancer treatment.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
None
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: