Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


Appropriate Use Criteria Published for Valvular Heart Disease Imaging Tests


 

WASHINGTON (Sept. 1, 2017) -- The American College of Cardiology, along with several partnering societies, today released appropriate use criteria addressing the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease.

Initial diagnosis and subsequent follow-up for valvular heart disease frequently rely on imaging with more than one imaging modality. Rapidly evolving less-invasive and transcatheter treatment options have fueled the need for precise preprocedural and intraprocedural anatomic and functional imaging.

"As imaging technologies and clinical applications continue to advance, the health care community must understand how best to incorporate these technologies into daily clinical care and how to choose between new and established imaging technologies," said John U. Doherty, MD, professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University and chair of the writing committee.

This document addresses the appropriate use of multiple imaging modalities available to clinicians in the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease. It covers the spectrum of patients with valvular heart disease -- from patients with no symptoms who are suspected of having valvular heart disease to patients with signs and symptoms ranging from mild to severe. A standardized approach was used to create different categories of indications with the goal of capturing actual real-world clinical scenarios. These clinical scenarios, or indications, were developed by the writing committee to cover established and emerging treatment approaches for valvular heart disease. An independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios, assessing whether the use of an imaging test for each indication fell into one of the following categories: Appropriate, May Be Appropriate or Rarely Appropriate.

The goal of this document is to identify all imaging tests that are considered reasonable for a given clinical indication. Therefore, the testing modalities were rated for their level of appropriateness specific to clinical scenarios rather than a forced rank order comparison against other testing modalities.

According to the writing committee, the indications are, at times, intended to be broad to cover an array of cardiovascular signs and symptoms and to account for the ordering physician's best judgment regarding the presence of cardiovascular abnormalities. However, there are likely clinical scenarios that are not covered in the document.

The ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease will publish online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology and the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. This document is the first of two companion appropriate use criteria documents developed by these partnering societies. The second companion document, addressing multimodality imaging in structural heart disease, will publish at a later date.

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

The 2019 Legislative Agenda

A new governor and many new legislators make 2019 a learning year as the state's top healthcare organizations seek to address a number of old issues and tweak some new solutions unveiled last year.

Read More

Updated Cholesterol Guidelines Take a Personalized Approach

The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology released updated cholesterol clinical guidelines in November 2018, taking a more nuanced approach to care over a patient's lifetime.

Read More

Sharing Data, Saving Lives

In an increasingly connected medical ecosystem where patient safety, health status improvement, and provider reimbursement are impacted at every point along the continuum, the need to efficiently, securely share data appears to have reached a tipping point.

Read More

New Rules in Heart Disease

A number of guideline changes and updates warrant more education around statin use and blood pressure monitoring, but local cardiologists say the higher standards are a game changer.

Read More

Dr. Ashish Shah: A Heart for Transplant Patients

Dr. Ashish Shah is the driving force behind the growth and innovation at one of the nation's busiest heart transplant programs.

Read More

Heart Monitor

Cardiovascular news of note.

Read More

ECMO Program Thriving at TriStar Centennial

A TriStar Centennial, a team approach is key to hospital's successful ECMO program.

Read More

Alexander Looks for Innovation, Asks Council Fellows for Input

Sen. Lamar Alexander asks stakeholders and future leaders to weigh in on ways to improve health outcomes, lower costs.

Read More

CMS Utilizes Dartboard Approach to Modernizing the Medicare Drug Benefit

Controlling pharmaceutical prices remains a hot topic, judging from the 6,415 comments received in response to the CMS proposed rule: "Modernizing Part D and Medicare Advantage to Lower Drug Prices and Reduce Out-of-Pocket Expenses."

Read More

A Conversation with LHC Director Molly Vice

Every company should have a succession plan. LHC plays a key role in planning for the next generation of leaders for an entire industry.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
ACC, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, Imaging, Valvular Heart Disease
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: