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Flooding in Louisiana


 
© gallofoto

Our thoughts and prayers are with all those impacted by the historic flooding in Louisiana, including our good friends at Amedisys. The nation's second largest provider of home healthcare has its corporate office in Baton Rouge and executive office in Nashville.

Over the last few weeks, the company has suffered grave personal losses in the face of the flood. The company's founder and former CEO, Bill Borne, was among those killed in the natural disaster. In addition, 86 of the company's employees experienced flooding in their homes, cars, or both.

Led by CEO Paul Kusserow, Amedisys has taken an active role in helping begin the process of rebuilding. The company has provided financial assistance for employees who have suffered property losses. Staff members in the affected areas set out in boats to help evacuate their colleagues and to deliver supplies. Amedisys employees outside of Louisiana have donated money and truckloads of supplies to help. The company also set up fuel tankers to enable clinicians with cars to bypass long lines and limited supplies at gas stations so that they could reach patients as quickly as possible.

Having experienced our own 500-year flood in 2010, Nashvillians well know the need for assistance remains long after the media coverage dies down. According to the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency, financial donations are the most impactful at this point. For more information on organizations active in the disaster recovery, go online to tnema.org or make a donation through the American Red Cross at redcross.org.


WEB:

TEMA

Nashville Chapter of the America Red Cross

 
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Tags:
Amedisys, American Red Cross, Bill Borne, Disaster Relief, Louisiana Flood, Natural Disaster, Paul Kusserow, TEMA, Tennessee Emergency Management Agency
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