Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


Landmark Vanderbilt Studies Find IV Saline Less Beneficial Than Balanced Fluids for Patient Survival


 

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is encouraging its medical providers to stop using saline as intravenous fluid therapy for most patients, a change provoked by two companion landmark studies released today that are anticipated to improve patients' survival and decrease kidney complications.

Saline, used in medicine for more than a century, contains high concentrations of sodium chloride, which is similar to table salt. Vanderbilt researchers found that patients do better if, instead, they are given balanced fluids that closely resemble the liquid part of blood.

"Our results suggest that using primarily balanced fluids should prevent death or severe kidney dysfunction for hundreds of Vanderbilt patients and tens of thousands of patients across the country each year," said study author Matthew Semler, MD, MSc, assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

"Because balanced fluids and saline are similar in cost, the finding of better patient outcomes with balanced fluids in two large trials has prompted a change in practice at Vanderbilt toward using primarily balanced fluids for intravenous fluid therapy."

The Vanderbilt research, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, examined over 15,000 intensive care patients and over 13,000 emergency department patients who were assigned to receive saline or balanced fluids if they required intravenous fluid.

In both studies, the incidence of serious kidney problems or death was about 1 percent lower in the balanced fluids group compared to the saline group.

"The difference, while small for individual patients, is significant on a population level. Each year in the United States, millions of patients receive intravenous fluids," said study author Wesley Self, MD, MPH, associate professor of Emergency Medicine.

"When we say a 1 percent reduction that means thousands and thousands of patients would be better off," he said.

The authors estimate this change may lead to at least 100,000 fewer patients suffering death or kidney damage each year in the US.

"Doctors have been giving patients IV fluids for over a hundred years and saline has been the most common fluid patients have been getting," said study author Todd Rice, MD, MSc, associate professor of Medicine.

"With the number of patients treated at Vanderbilt every year, the use of balanced fluids in patients could result in hundreds or even thousands of fewer patients in our community dying or developing kidney failure. After these results became available, medical care at Vanderbilt changed so that doctors now preferentially use balanced fluids," he said.

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Cancer Care on the Cutting Edge

Nashville physician-scientists are helping lead the way in advancing cancer care.

Read More

The Evolution of Senior Living

The senior living industry is undergoing a makeover as baby boomers shift focus from medical-directed care to hospitality-driven services.

Read More

When Basic Science Becomes a Breakthrough

Noted immunologists joined forces at the recent International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference to discuss the importance of fostering and funding basic science.

Read More

Dr. Meredith McKean Brings New Hope, More Options for Melanoma Patients

Oncologist Meredith McKean, MD, MPH, overseeing Sarah Cannon's Melanoma Research Program

Read More

ONcology Rounds

News of note in cancer research, treatment and partnerships.

Read More

Ascension Saint Thomas Opens Cancer Center

Ascension Saint Thomas recently celebrated the grand opening of their comprehensive new cancer center on the Midtown campus.

Read More

NMGMA 10 Minute Takeaway

Medicare Part B representative from Palmetto GBA offered updates and resources to navigate compliance.

Read More

Improving Quality, Lowering Cost of Care for Seniors

Five years into the Medicare Shared Savings Program, more and more ACOs are beginning to demonstrate the ability to improve quality while lowering costs.

Read More

Planning Ahead: Patients & Power of Attorney

The time to think about a durable power of attorney is long before it's needed. Barbara Moss discusses the importance of the document in healthcare.

Read More

Council on Aging Honors Middle Tennesseans

The Council on Aging (COA) of Middle Tennessee hosted their 27th Annual Sage Awards on Oct. 29. With a belief that aging should be celebrated and embraced and that older adults have a lifetime of wisdom and experience to offer communities, the Sage Awards are presented each year to older adults who have made outstanding contributions to Middle Tennessee.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
None
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: