Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


TDH Statement on Flu Season


 

The Tennessee Department of Health released the following information to share with patients across Tennessee during this season's deadly flu outbreak:

The Tennessee Department of Health is seeing increased reports of seasonal influenza and other respiratory illnesses across the state. As flu season continues, we remind Tennesseans about measures to take to slow the spread of flu in our communities.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and TDH recommend a yearly flu vaccine for everyone aged six months and older. It is not too late to benefit from a flu shot this season and to assure you are protecting those around you. TDH reminds the public that people can be sick with the flu and transmit it up to 24 hours before they feel ill.

TDH also strongly encourages taking precautions to prevent infection with the flu, such as avoiding contact with sick people. People who are sick should stay home for at least 24 hours after symptoms have resolved to protect others and prevent spreading the disease. This should include avoiding going to work, school and other public places while ill, and limiting visits to people in nursing homes or hospitals.

TDH also recommends people who are sick or have sick people in their households, such as small children be particularly careful when considering visits to friends or loved ones in hospitals, long-term care facilities and other places where sick and vulnerable people live or receive care. Consider calls or "virtual" visits with technology such as video chats to prevent the spread of germs in these settings, and respect any limits on visitation policies that facilities may be compelled to implement during flu season.

To protect your family and others, always use "respiratory etiquette" such as coughing into your elbow or a tissue rather than your hands, and wash hands frequently with soap and water or with an alcohol-based hand rub. Routine cleaning and disinfection in the home and workplace are also important to reduce flu risks.

Some groups of people such as infants, the elderly and people with certain medical conditions are at highest risk of getting severe complications from the flu. People in these groups should consult a health care provider if they suspect infection with the flu and should begin antiviral medications if recommended by their provider as soon as possible. However, few people with the flu or other respiratory illnesses need to go to an emergency room. TDH recommends that people who are not severely ill call their health care provider first to talk about whether they need to be seen, and if so, where would be most appropriate place to go.

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Cancer Care on the Cutting Edge

Nashville physician-scientists are helping lead the way in advancing cancer care.

Read More

The Evolution of Senior Living

The senior living industry is undergoing a makeover as baby boomers shift focus from medical-directed care to hospitality-driven services.

Read More

When Basic Science Becomes a Breakthrough

Noted immunologists joined forces at the recent International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference to discuss the importance of fostering and funding basic science.

Read More

Dr. Meredith McKean Brings New Hope, More Options for Melanoma Patients

Oncologist Meredith McKean, MD, MPH, overseeing Sarah Cannon's Melanoma Research Program

Read More

ONcology Rounds

News of note in cancer research, treatment and partnerships.

Read More

Ascension Saint Thomas Opens Cancer Center

Ascension Saint Thomas recently celebrated the grand opening of their comprehensive new cancer center on the Midtown campus.

Read More

NMGMA 10 Minute Takeaway

Medicare Part B representative from Palmetto GBA offered updates and resources to navigate compliance.

Read More

Improving Quality, Lowering Cost of Care for Seniors

Five years into the Medicare Shared Savings Program, more and more ACOs are beginning to demonstrate the ability to improve quality while lowering costs.

Read More

Planning Ahead: Patients & Power of Attorney

The time to think about a durable power of attorney is long before it's needed. Barbara Moss discusses the importance of the document in healthcare.

Read More

Council on Aging Honors Middle Tennesseans

The Council on Aging (COA) of Middle Tennessee hosted their 27th Annual Sage Awards on Oct. 29. With a belief that aging should be celebrated and embraced and that older adults have a lifetime of wisdom and experience to offer communities, the Sage Awards are presented each year to older adults who have made outstanding contributions to Middle Tennessee.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
Flu, Influenza, Tennessee Department of Health
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: