Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


Vanderbilt Takes Investigational New Drug From Bench To Bedside


 
P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD

Patients with serious brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia could benefit from an investigational new drug (IND) that has received notification from the FDA that testing in humans may proceed after more than 10 years of research by scientists at Vanderbilt University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

"This is the first instance I am aware of where an academic drug discovery group moved a molecule for treatment of chronic brain disorders all the way from early discovery to human trials without there being, at some point along the way, a pharmaceutical partner," said P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD, director, Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). "And that really is crossing what people refer to all of the time as the 'Valley of Death,' where good research discoveries have a hard time moving into the real testing phase."

For Alzheimer's disease, the IND targets major pathologies of the disease and offers highly selective activation of a key receptor unlike the current standard of care, cholinesterase inhibitors. Vanderbilt researchers said the molecule might be broadly effective across a number of cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. In schizophrenia, current treatments address the positive symptoms of the disease, including hallucinations and delusions, but not the negative symptoms and cognitive disturbances of schizophrenia. "People who treat schizophrenia patients commonly agree that the negative symptoms and cognitive disturbances are the major factors that decrease the ability for these patients to integrate in society," Conn said. "And we have no treatments for those so our hope is that this molecule will be effective."

VCNDD Co-Director Craig W. Lindsley, PhD, director of Medicinal Chemistry and the William K. Warren, Jr. Chair in Medicine, said phase I testing will assess drug safety and tolerability in young healthy volunteers, a process that could take a year. If successful, the phase II and III studies would include patients with either Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia and could take three-five years to complete.

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Alexander: Bipartisan Legislation Will Lower What Americans Pay Out of Their Own Pockets for Health Care

The Lower Health Care Costs Act of 2019 contains nearly three dozen proposals from at least 16 Republican, 14 Democrat senators

Read More

If You Build It, They Will Come

Middle Tennessee's healthcare options continue to expand through new construction and facility renovations and additions.

Read More

Lease, Build, Buy, Sell: Finding the Best Fit for Each Medical Practice

When it comes to medical real estate, there is no one 'right' answer for every practice. Instead, experts say it's important to understand all the options before making a decision that impacts individual physicians, the practice ... and ultimately, patients.

Read More

Dr. Jerry Tannenbaum: Redefining, Redesigning Nephrology

Innovative building models and telemedicine mean better care for patients nationwide.

Read More

Wayfinding in Healthcare

With expansions, renovations and additions to healthcare facilities over time, the ability to easily navigate a campus is often lost along the way. Taking time to consider wayfinding can vastly improve the way patients, visitors and staff engage with the environment.

Read More

Building Walls

Steve Ward & Associates prefab headwalls mean more savings, options for healthcare clients.

Read More

LipiFlow®: Advanced Procedure to Treat Meibomian Gland Dysfunction & Chronic Dry Eye

In-office procedure can promote eyelid health and provide relief from dry eye.

Read More

SCALE 2019 Showcases Latest in Aesthetics Medicine

Now in its 14th year, the Music City SCALE Conference broke previous attendance records, with plans for additional growth in 2020.

Read More

Rethinking the Approach to Acne

New options and research have changed the traditional approach to treating acne.

Read More

Financing the Deal

Healthcare investment experts gathered for the Nashville Health Care Council's annual Financing the Deal panel focused on private equity trends and strategies.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
None
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: