Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


VUMC Studying Potential Approach to Reverse Precancerous Stomach Lesions


 

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) cancer researcher James Goldenring, MD, PhD, has received a two-year, $200,000 grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation in Pleasantville, New York, to begin clinical trials of a potential approach for reversing precancerous stomach lesions.

Stomach cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide after lung, liver and colorectal cancers. In the United States, 28,000 people will be diagnosed with stomach cancer this year, and nearly 11,000 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Goldenring said the grant will support an international collaborative trial with colleagues at Yonsei University Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, to test the effectiveness of the drug Selumetinib to reverse pre-cancerous lesions in patients following endoscopic resection of stage I gastric cancer. Koreans have one of the world's highest incidences of gastric cancer.

"I am extremely grateful for the support that we have received from the DeGregorio Family Foundation," said Goldenring, the Paul W. Sanger Professor of Experimental Surgery at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. "It is often difficult to obtain support for trials that require clinical collaboration at international sites."

Selumetinib blocks MEK, an enzyme downstream of Ras, a signaling protein that regulates cell growth and survival. Abnormal Ras activation, possibly triggered by other signaling molecules, is associated with up to one-third of all human cancers and recently was identified in a large percentage of gastric cancers. A year ago, Goldenring reported in Gastroenterology that Selumetinib, a drug recently approved for use in patients with advanced thyroid cancer, halted and reversed neoplastic progression in a mouse model of activated Ras induction of metaplasia and precancerous lesions in the stomach.

It appears that underneath the abnormal metaplastic cells hides a lineage of normal progenitor cells, which can regenerate the normal mucosal layer of the stomach, Goldenring said. When the consequences of abnormal Ras activation were blocked by Selumetinib, normal cells pushed the abnormal tissue out of the mucosa. The grant will support a study of MEK inhibition in patients who have had local endoscopic removal of a stage I gastric cancer. These patients have a 2 to 5 percent per year incidence of developing a second cancer in the stomach because a large amount of metaplastic mucosa remains.

Astra-Zeneca Corporation will provide the Selumetinib for the trial. Goldenring is professor of Surgery and Cell & Developmental Biology, vice-chair for Surgical Research in the Section of Surgical Sciences and co-director of the Epithelial Biology Center at VUMC. He also is a staff physician at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville campus).

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Cancer Care on the Cutting Edge

Nashville physician-scientists are helping lead the way in advancing cancer care.

Read More

The Evolution of Senior Living

The senior living industry is undergoing a makeover as baby boomers shift focus from medical-directed care to hospitality-driven services.

Read More

When Basic Science Becomes a Breakthrough

Noted immunologists joined forces at the recent International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference to discuss the importance of fostering and funding basic science.

Read More

Dr. Meredith McKean Brings New Hope, More Options for Melanoma Patients

Oncologist Meredith McKean, MD, MPH, overseeing Sarah Cannon's Melanoma Research Program

Read More

ONcology Rounds

News of note in cancer research, treatment and partnerships.

Read More

Ascension Saint Thomas Opens Cancer Center

Ascension Saint Thomas recently celebrated the grand opening of their comprehensive new cancer center on the Midtown campus.

Read More

NMGMA 10 Minute Takeaway

Medicare Part B representative from Palmetto GBA offered updates and resources to navigate compliance.

Read More

Improving Quality, Lowering Cost of Care for Seniors

Five years into the Medicare Shared Savings Program, more and more ACOs are beginning to demonstrate the ability to improve quality while lowering costs.

Read More

Planning Ahead: Patients & Power of Attorney

The time to think about a durable power of attorney is long before it's needed. Barbara Moss discusses the importance of the document in healthcare.

Read More

Council on Aging Honors Middle Tennesseans

The Council on Aging (COA) of Middle Tennessee hosted their 27th Annual Sage Awards on Oct. 29. With a belief that aging should be celebrated and embraced and that older adults have a lifetime of wisdom and experience to offer communities, the Sage Awards are presented each year to older adults who have made outstanding contributions to Middle Tennessee.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
cancer research, DeGregorio Family Foundation, grand rounds, James Goldenring, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, VUMC
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: