Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


Babies Born With Opioid Withdrawal Increasing In Rural Areas


 
(c) Photodisc

An increasing number of newborns are being born with drug withdrawal symptoms from opioids in rural areas of the United States as compared to births in urban areas, according to a JAMA Pediatrics study.

The study, led by researchers from Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and the University of Minnesota, tracked newborns treated for opioid-related issues over 10 years. Newborns diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to their withdrawal symptoms increased from nearly one case per 1,000 births in rural areas from 2003-2004 to 7.5 cases per 1,000 births from 2012-2013, nearly 80 percent higher than the growth rate of such cases in urban areas.

Senior author Stephen W. Patrick, MD, MPH, MS, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said the results highlight a dramatic and disproportionate rise in opioid-related complications for these patients in rural communities. "As a nation, there is an urgent need to develop strategies tailored to rural communities focused on prevention and expansion of treatment," Patrick said.

"We need to develop means to support rural hospitals, especially critical access hospitals, that are on the front lines in providing care for mothers and infants impacted by the opioid epidemic," he added.

NAS patients are more likely to have respiratory complications, low birth-weight, feeding difficulty and seizures as compared to other infants.

"Our study highlights an urgent need to fund providers and programs that will help improve access to opioid prevention and treatment services for rural women and children. Maternal opioid use requires special attention given the poor outcomes and high costs. If we can provide resources to the areas that need them the most, we can do more on the frontlines to address the opioid crisis for our most vulnerable patients, said lead author and Mott pediatrician Nicole Villapiano, MD.

Rural infants accounted for more than 21 percent of NAS cases from 2012-2013, up from 13 percent in 2003-2004. Maternal opioid use in rural areas was also nearly 70 percent higher than in urban areas in 2012-2013, with 8 cases per 1,000 childbirth hospitalizations compared to 4.8 cases per 1,000 childbirth hospitalizations in urban areas.

Web:

Rural & Urban Differences in NAS & Maternal Opioid Use, 2004 to 2013

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Amidst Growing Measles Outbreaks, AMA Urges Public to Get Vaccinated

Reminds physicians to discuss the safety and efficacy of vaccines with patients, as well as educate them on health risks associated with not vaccinating children

Read More

Pivotal Clinical Trial Investigates New Technology for Managing Uncontrolled Hypertension

Read More

The Biggest Threats to Public Health

Noted public health expert Dr. William Schaffner shares insights on three of his top public health threats.

Read More

Covering Kids

A new study finds higher rates of uninsured children in Tennessee and other non-expansion states.

Read More

Severe Asthma Disparities

A recent study found racial disparities in ED usage for severe asthma become statistically insignificant when factoring out socioeconomic elements, paving the way for more emphasis on differences in community than biology.

Read More

Mark Your Calendar for Music City SCALE

The 14th Annual Music City SCALE meeting featuring up to 22 hours of CME for medical practitioners is set for May 9-11 at the Music City Center.

Read More

Public Health Happens in the Community ... Not Just the Clinic

Public health continues to lead the way to eliminate health disparities and create a system that focuses not just on the absence of illness but the promotion of wellbeing.

Read More

Gum Disease and Tooth Loss Associated With Higher Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in African-American Women

Poor oral health was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in African-American women.

Read More

A New Vision for Safety Net Care

After 14 months of study, the Indigent Care Stakeholder Work Team has released their vision for safety net care in Nashville.

Read More

Modern Healthcare & Critical Connections Present Social Determinants of Health Symposium

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, NAS, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Nicole Villapiano, Opioid Addiction, Opioid-Addicted Babies, Rural Health, Stephen Patrick, University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Minnesota
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: