Archives     Advertise     Editorial Calendar     Subscribe     Contact Us    


ACHEMT Hosts Opioid Educational Event


 
Panelists (L-R) Cheryl McClatchey, Dr. Bill Paul, Dr. Jeff Guy, Dr. Elizabeth Ann Stringer and Justin Lanning (not pictured) shared different perspectives on the state's opioid crisis.

In late March, the American College of Healthcare Executives Middle Tennessee (ACHEMT) sponsored an educational luncheon involving a topic that affects every healthcare leader today: the opioid crisis. Tennessee ranks second in the nation for opioid abuse, and the event drew a record number of 131 registered attendees who heard from a variety of voices active in solving this epidemic.

The opening speaker was Commissioner Marie Williams, LCSW, of the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and chair of the Governor's Opioid Workgroup. Williams shared statistics from the Substance Abuse Treatment Group illustrating the variances among populations that seek out treatment for illnesses. She said 77 percent of those with hypertension, 73 percent of those with diabetes, and 11 percent of those with an opioid addiction will seek out treatment. Williams also drew attention to a National Institute of Health study that documented patients with asthma and hypertension relapse more often than those addicted to opioids. William's task force is working hard to change the popular attitude that addiction is a moral failure rather than a disease.

Panel moderator Cheryl McClatchey, vice president of Behavioral Health Programs of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee orchestrated a compelling discussion with the event panelists.

Elizabeth Ann Stringer, PhD, - neuroscientist, chief science officer and co-founder of Axial Healthcare - discussed JACHO assessments on pain and the catalyst for the epidemic. She also spoke about risk stratifying and "catastrophizing,"or the ability to cope, rating. Stringer emphasized the need for the government to bring multiple stakeholders together and highlighted some of the unintended consequences that can happen when policy is instituted into law. From a neuroscience standpoint, she also emphasized the importance of setting expectations according to a patients' ability to cope rating and recognizing that everyone's pain progression is different.

Jeff Guy, MD, vice president of Critical Care and Emergency Department services for HCA, brought a unique voice to the discussion. His prior experience as a burn and trauma surgeon was reflected in his concern regarding stigmatizing legitimate opioid prescription and use. He also shared that pain is the chief complaint in emergency rooms across the nation. Over 10 million patients per year are seeking treatment for pain through the ED. His framework of viewing the epidemic through treatment of underlying conditions, such as depression or bipolar disorder, looks to clinical effectiveness and tools of prediction, such as a history of trauma.

Bill Paul, MD, director of Metro Nashville Health Department, also spoke to a patient's trauma history, such as adverse childhood events, and a community's response to this. Financially, he pointed out the significant downstream costs of opioid addiction, such as HIV and Hepatitis C. He also made several other points concerning not marginalizing victims of the epidemic, decreasing the stigma, and teaching coping mechanisms in schools. Paul also spoke to expanding Medicaid to cover services and incorporating law enforcement, EMS and other stakeholders involved in keeping Naloxone readily available in emergency situations. Paul emphasized being "trauma informed" and teaching resiliency while decreasing silos and decreasing the separation of behavioral health from all other areas of medicine.

Justin Lanning called on his experience as CEO of 180 Health Partners and shared ideas on a "cortisol reduction programs" and coaching people to utilize healthier coping mechanisms. Lanning's emphasis is on decreasing the number of opioid addicted babies. He also spoke to adverse childhood events.

Lanning also issued a call to action involving three components. First, he said, was to provide appropriate expectations, including not emphasizing a zero out of 10 as the only acceptable pain management result but perhaps achieving a one or two out of 10 with a focus on the ability to adequately perform activities of daily living. Second, he said attention needs to be paid to helping those in need manage their stress. Third, he called for providing mentoring programs.

All of the expert panelists agreed that decreasing the stigma that separates opioid addiction from other medical illnesses is essential to solving this crisis. Setting appropriate expectations and reducing the opioid epidemic will take all stakeholders involved.


WEB:

ACHEMT

 
Share:

Related Articles:


Recent Articles

Study Finds Certain Genetic Test Not Useful in Predicting Heart Disease Risk

A Polygenic Risk Score -- a genetic assessment that doctors have hoped could predict coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients -- has been found not to be a useful predictive biomarker for disease risk, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Read More

Tennessee Infants Exposed to Hep C at Birth Often Not Tested for Virus

Most Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth are not later tested to see if they acquired the virus, according to a study by researchers at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt and the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy.

Read More

THA, TMA, TNA Outline Legislative Priorities

With the Tennessee General Assembly back in full swing, the state's major healthcare associations outline 2020 priorities.

Read More

Cardiac Innovation in Nashville

From transplants to trials, Nashville hospitals are leading the way in cardiac care.

Read More

A Modern Love Story: Where Technology, Healthcare & Construction Go Hand-in-Hand

Technology has changed every aspect of our lives. In fact, I had a healthy laugh a few weeks ago when I showed my children an old rotary phone and, get this, they did not know what it was.

Read More

Reeves/Smith Bill to Prevent Next Generation of Nicotine Addiction Garners Broad Industry Support

In late January, a group of more than 25 organizations from across Tennessee announced their support for legislation that seeks to prevent the next generation of nicotine addicts in the state.

Read More

Physician Spotlight: A Heart for Healing

TriStar Summit cardiologist Kristen Kerr is passionate about education, improving outcomes in women's heart health.

Read More

Heart Monitor

Read More

Ifetroban for Treating DMD-Associated Cardiomyopathy

Following successful preclinical trials and FDA funding, Cumberland Pharmaceuticals is preparing to launch a new Phase II trial of ifetroban to treat cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patients.

Read More

Endocrine Society Celebrates Progress from Bench to Bedside

Endocrine Society Chief Professional & Clinical Affairs Officer Robert Lash, MD, discusses the field, annual meeting, road shows and more.

Read More

Email Print
 
 

 

 


Tags:
ACHEMT, American College of Healthcare Executives Middle Tennessee, Bill Paul, Cheryl McClatchey, Elizabeth Ann Stringer, Jeff Guy, Justin Lanning, Marie Williams, Opioid Epidemic
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: